Reading update, August 2014

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Wow, only six months since my last post! …. I have been reading in the meantime, really! I am happy, though, to finally be doing a monthly reading update. These days I’m working full-time, so my blogging and reading time has been somewhat reduced. My pace is somewhat slow but I always look forward to the time I have before bed when I can read uninterrupted.

I actually haven’t finished a book this month, but I’m in the middle of a few – 

The Secret Lives of Codebreakers: The Men and Women Who Cracked the Enigma Code at Bletchley Park, by Sinclair McKay

This is the book I’ve made the most progress with lately, but I have to admit it’s falling a little flat of my expectations. I think a book on the actual history of the code breaking work at the Park would be a bit more interesting and engaging. That said, it does give interesting snapshots of life in Britain during the war, which we Americans don’t always hear much about in school. 

The Happiest Toddler on the Block, by Harvey Karp

This is the first book I’ve read on dealing with a toddler and though some of the book is rather cheesy, I think it would be helpful for anyone who needs some encouragement and simple advice during toddlerhood. I like that he recommends being empathetic first; it’s a concept that has helped me many times with my own sweet, temperamental toddler.

A Short History of Nearly Everything, by Bill Bryson

I simultaneously love and dislike this book. I love it because I really enjoy Bill Bryson’s style and I think he’s very good at making innocuous subjects engaging. But the fact is that I don’t love science all that much, and that is what this book is really all about. So, while I enjoy the book when I read it, I really have to be in the right mood for it, and it’s a long book. Hopefully I’ll get inspired to finish soon!

The Supper of the Lamb: A Culinary Reflection, by Robert Farrar Capon

I love books such as this one – they bring you back to the basics of preparing, cooking, and eating food, which is a subject that easily becomes overwhelming and complicated if you let it. Capon’s ability to combine food and spirituality as the subject of the book is unique and very special. 

 

What’s the best thing you’ve read lately?

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